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Waves of orange, glowing lava and smoky ash erupted from the world’s largest active volcano and people living on Hawaii’s Big Island were warned to be ready if their communities are threatened. The eruption of Mauna Loa wasn’t immediately endangering towns on Monday, but officials told residents to be ready to evacuate if lava flows started heading toward populated areas. The U.S. Geological Survey says the eruption began late Sunday night in the volcano on the Big Island. The agency warned residents at risk from Mauna Loa's lava flows to review their eruption preparations. Scientists had been on alert because of a recent spike in earthquakes at the summit of the volcano, which last erupted in 1984.

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China’s strategy of controlling the coronavirus with lockdowns, mass testing and quarantines has provoked the greatest show of public dissent against the ruling Communist Party in decades. Most protesters on the mainland and in Hong Kong have focused their anger on restrictions that confine families to their homes for months. Global health experts say the “zero-COVID” policies saved lives at first. But now China’s population has very little exposure to the virus. And China is using only domestically developed vaccines that are less effective than those widely used elsewhere. Experts agree that finding a path forward will be difficult without surges in cases and deaths.

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World Cup host Qatar sits in a region that is warming faster than anywhere else on earth besides the Arctic. The wealthy Gulf Arab nation has been able to pay for extreme adaptive measures so far like outdoor air-conditioning to mitigate the effects of rising temperatures in some areas. Qatar has inched forward in recent years with climate pledges. But the transition away from hydrocarbons will not be simple for one of the world's largest producers and exporters of natural gas.

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NASA's Orion capsule is now circling the moon in an orbit stretching tens of thousands of miles. The capsule and its three test dummies entered lunar orbit Friday, more than a week after launching on the test flight. It will remain in this broad but stable orbit for nearly a week, before heading home. As of Friday, the capsule was 238,000 miles from Earth and is expected to reach a maximum distance of almost 270,000 miles in a few days. NASA considers this a dress rehearsal for the next moon flyby in 2024, with astronauts. A lunar landing by astronauts could follow as soon as 2025.

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The omicron variant is driving U.S. COVID-19 case counts higher in many places just in time for the holiday season. The ever-morphing mutant began its assault on humanity a year ago. Experts soon expect a wave to wash over the U.S. Cases nationally now average around 39,300 a day, though that's believed to be an undercount. Hospitalizations are at about 28,000 a day and deaths about 340 a day. Yet a fifth of the population hasn’t been vaccinated. Most eligible Americans haven’t gotten the latest boosters. And many have stopped wearing masks. Meanwhile, the mutating virus keeps finding ways to avoid defeat.

The bodies of more than 80 Native American children are buried at the former Genoa Indian Industrial School in central Nebraska. But for decades, the location of the student cemetery has been a mystery, lost over time after the school closed in 1931 and memories faded of the once-busy campus that sprawled over 640 acres in the tiny community of Genoa. That mystery may soon be solved thanks to efforts by researchers who pored over century-old documents and maps, examined land with specially trained dogs and made use of ground-penetrating radar in search of the lost graves.

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Officials say thieves who broke into a southern German museum and stole hundreds of ancient gold coins got in and out in nine minutes. Police have launched an international hunt for the thieves and their loot, consisting of 483 Celtic coins and a lump of unworked gold discovered near the town of Manching in 1999. Museum security systems recorded that a door was pried open at 1:26 a.m. and then how the thieves left again at 1:35 a.m. Bavarian police said there were “parallels” between the heist in Manching and the theft of priceless jewels and a large gold coin in Dresden and Berlin. Bavaria’s minister of science and arts said Wednesday evidence pointed to the work of professionals.

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A woman who got a new lease on life after a ground-breaking heart transplant between an HIV-positive donor and recipient got to meet the family of the woman who gave it to her. Miriam Nieves, 62, on Tuesday eagerly hugged the mother and sisters of Brittany Newton, a 30-year old Louisiana woman whose heart she received earlier this year in what doctors at Montefiore Medical Center say was the first heart transplant from an HIV-positive donor to an HIV-positive recipient. The transplant happened in April. In order to find a match, doctors at the hospital expanded their search to include HIV-positive donors.

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New Mexico’s State Investment Council is pledging $100 million to a tech-focused nonprofit, the council’s biggest commitment on record to a single venture fund. The council gave unanimous approval of the investment Tuesday into America’s Frontier Fund, the Albuquerque Journal reported. America’s Frontier Fund, or AFF, bills itself as the first investment platform committed to boosting technological innovation in the U.S. The money will come from New Mexico’s Severance Tax Permanent Fund toward venture firms that support local startups. The firm's CEO, Gilman Louie, says they will build a “venture studio” in Albuquerque and satellite studios around the state. They would offer support to major research institutions and new start-ups.